Tag Archives: meditation bowl

Gifts for Yogis

Gift Inspiration For The Yogis In Your Life

 

Gifts for Yogis

 

A selection of gifts for yogis or for someone needing to relax, unwind and create a sense of calm  after a long day at the office.  Choose from our handcrafted copper sunflower tea light holders £19.00, which are perfect for creating soft ambient lighting for an evening practice. | 2. Aashe, one of our large hand embroidered, comfortable, floor cushions from our Kutch Collection for meditation. | 3.  A hand beaten, fair trade, copper meditation urli(bowl).  Just watching the coppery light created by  floating tea lights reflecting against the tiny hammered indentations creates a sense of calm.

The Making of a Copper Meditation Bowl

Seventeenth century craftsmanship meets modern design

 

 

Maud-interiors-copper-meditation-bowls

Seventeenth century craftsmanship meets modern design in these copper meditation bowls or urli.  Created by Tambat coppersmiths, as part of an initiative by social enterprise Coppre, each piece is painstakingly handcrafted.  The process is seeded in Tambat tradition and utilises techniques handed down from father to son over generations.

 

There are eight stages in the creation of our best-selling copper meditation bowls, from initially cutting the copper sheeting, to moulding the shape, to the skilled art of beating, buffering and lacquering, to the end result. One of the most complex processes, requiring a high degree of skill, strength, dexterity and keen hand-eye coordination is the beating stage.  Tiny rows of uniform indentations are created using a technique, called ‘Matharkaam, which is carried out using specially profiled beating hammers.  The indentations create a reflective, mirror-like, appearance which radiates light.  You can see the processes involved below:

 

 

 

sheets-of-copper

Sheets of copper

Making a copper meditation bowl

Cutting the copper sheet

Making a copper meditation bowl

The basic shape

making a copper meditation bowl

Heating the circle

making a copper meditation bowl

And cooling it

making a copper meditation bowl

Spinning the first draw to create the bowl shape

the making of a copper meditation bowl

Annealing the copper

the making of a copper meditation bowl

The raw copper meditation bowl (urli)

Beating-the-copper-urli

Beating to create rows of tiny uniform indentations

Buffing

Buffing

Lacquering

Lacquering

the-final-urli

The final copper meditation bowl

The history of the Tambat craftsmen

The Tambat people have been handcrafting copper ware since the seventeenth century.  They originally worked for the Peshwar rulers who were based in Pune, making armour, coins and cannons but with British rule and industrialisation they were forced to turn their attention to making utensils and ceremonial objects for the public.  The community has been declining over the years as alternative metals and plastic have replaced the demand for copper goods and there are now only about 80 Tambat households remaining.

Revitalising a dying craft

Coppre, a dynamic social enterprise, which is supported by Indian NGO, INTACH, has been set up to revitalise this dying craft and improve the livelihoods of the Tambat coppersmiths by introducing modern designs and providing training and marketing.  Copper wares were once considered heirlooms in India and we think that the timeless pieces Coppre and the Tambat craftsmen have created are ones to cherish and pass on.

 

Below, you can see some of the other designs in the range, from nature-inspired seed pod and sunflower tea light holders to copper platters.  Click here to see the entire collection.

 

copper-collection-Maud-interiors

 

Photos of the Tambat craftsmen, Coppre

Create Your Own Moroccan Hammam Experience

Moroccan hammam experience Riad 72

The hammam at Riad 72. Photo: Riad 72

 

If you are visiting Morocco I recommend you try a hammam either a private one at your riad or the nearest public one.  It’s essentially the Middle Eastern version of the steam room and its origins date back to Roman times.

 

Visiting a hammam is part of Moroccan life and men, women and children visit at least once a week.  Every neighbourhood has a hammam which is often situated near the communal bread oven to share the heat source.  If you are visiting the public hammam check out the times/days when it is open to women/men in advance and find out if you need to take products with you or if they are available to purchase.

 

My first hammam experience was at Riad 72 in Marrakech, which I wrote about in an earlier blog.   When they  suggested I try the hammam I have to admit that I was slightly nervous as I had visions of having my skin rubbed until it was red raw but I had nothing to worry about.  Ayesha, the hammam attendant or tellak, at Riad 72 has been giving hammam treatments for over 10 years and she even gives her ten month old baby the treatment to cleanse his skin.

 

The riad hammam is a large tadelakht covered wet room with a heated floor and a sunken bath at one end.  The bath is filled with hot water and the room fills with steam.  First you are covered in warm water to open your pores and then in a black soap made from olive oil infused with eucalyptus.  The soap cleanses and softens your skin.  Your hammam attendant then uses an exfoliating glove called a kessa to remove old skin cells.  This isn’t like an out of the jar body scrub this is serious exfoliation. You will see rolls of skin leaving your body but it is painless.

 

Once all your dead skin has been removed you are rinsed down and clay, called rhassoul, is mixed with water and applied to your entire body and your hair.  This is special lava clay from the Atlas Mountains which  is said to remove imperfections and tighten your skin.  Once the clay has dried on your skin you are rinsed down again so that all traces are removed.  I finished off with a relaxing argan oil and verbena full body massage.  My skin felt incredibly soft and rejuvenated for days afterwards and there was no redness.

 

Moroccan Hammam Riad 72

The massage room at Riad 72. Photo: Riad 72

 

Create Your Own Moroccan Hammam At Home

A hammam is a great way to unwind and pamper yourself at the same time.  You can create your own Moroccan hammam in your bathroom at home here’s how:

create your own hammam experience

1.  Create the right mood by lighting candles or try floating candles in our copper meditation urli for an ambient glow.

2.  Fill your bath with hot water or leave your shower running to create a steam filled room.

3.  Take a dip in the bath or under the shower  and then cover yourself with exfoliating soap.  There are a few providers of Moroccan soap and beauty treatments online but I am suggesting the Beldi soap with eucalyptus oil from Essence of Morocco.

4.  Once covered with soap start gently exfoliating with the kessa glove.  Work from the extremities in using long sweeping movements and applying pressure.

5.  Rinse off and apply a thin layer of rhassoul clay, lava clay, which is said to rid the skin of impurities, detoxifying the skin. I’m suggesting the Essence of Morocco Rhassoul Clay Mask because the mask is already mixed for you so it is easier to use.  The clay is mined from the Atlas Mountains in Morocco.   You can also use the mask as a natural shampoo and as a weekly face mask.

6.  Leave the mask for 5 – 10 minutes so that it is dry but not too tight and then rinse thoroughly with warm water.

7.  Finally to finish off the experience massage in Argan oil.  I like Essence of Morocco’s organic Argan Oil with Rose.

Afterwards your skin should feel cleansed, soft and rejuvenated and you should feel pampered and relaxed.

 

Please note this isn’t a sponsored post.  There are a number of online providers of Moroccan hammam products I have suggested the Essence of Morocco products because I have used them before and think the quality is good.

A Nomadic Chic Beach Home

The sitting room of this Santa Barbara beach home owned by Gina Tolleson cleverly mixes global textiles to create a nomadic chic look.  I think the secret to this look is to mix patterns, textures and textiles but keep to a limited colour palette.  Here the reds and oranges of the embroidered cushions, the floor rug and the lamp  work with the brown and neutral tones of the Moroccan rug on the sofa, and the natural wood of the sofa and tray.   You can read the full article here.

 

nomadic chic

 

Create Your Own Nomadic Chic Look

Here are some ideas for creating a similar look:

1.  A selection of vintage hand embroidered cushions from our Kutch collection.  |  2.  A vintage Azilal rug from our Rug Collection.  3.  Handcrafted copper meditation bowl.   4.  Moroccan Pom Pom blanket in natural from our Souk Collection.

 

C-Home photographer article Nancy Neil.